As its known as “chai” in Persia, tea is one of the most important traditions of daily life. Tea has become the national drink and the whole northern region of Persia along the Caspian Sea is dedicated to the production of tea. Tea is consumed in the morning, after every meal, as well as all throughout the day. It is the drink that is served to guests and friends alike. Persian tea is about more than just the beverage; it is about being with family, friends, relaxing, and exchanging conversation. Persians always drink their tea in glass cups as to feel the warmth emanating from the drink.
Every morning, in houses all over Iran, a gas burner flickers to life under a kettle that will continue to boil all day. It boils through morning prayers, lunches of rice and kebabs, afternoon conversation and late into the evening meal, sustaining talk of politics, gossip and news well into the night. The kettle contains tea, one of the most important cornerstones of Iranian culture, and the tea house is its centuries-old keeper. Iranian tea comes in a variety of subtle flavours, but its defining characteristic is its deep reddish-brown colour, which tea-drinkers can choose to dilute with water depending on their preference.